Mountain Bike Action tests the DBX 3.0 All Mountain Helmet

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New Impact Technology for Every RiderNew Impact Technology for Every Rider

Between the price, comfortable fit and subtle shell size, we were impressed with the DBX 3.0 and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to any type of trail rider.

Helmet technology was slow to change until the last couple years, with brands like MIPS and 6D taking new approaches to keeping riders safer in the event of a crash.

South African-based Leatt is no stranger to protection with their extensive line of braces and pads. Leatt first found success in the moto arena with its neck braces and later carried that legacy over into mountain biking. The DBX 3.0 is the newest innovation in helmet technology with fresh impact technology aimed at keeping riders safer.

We got a hold of the DBX to put it through a full test to see if it was more than just hype. Tech Info: The heart of the DBX 3.0 is Leatt’s 360 Turbine technology and Armourgel cushioning. The 360 Turbine looks and feels like little bumpers that allow for the helmet to rotate separately from the rider’s head in the event of an impact.

Leatt claims these turbines reduce rotational acceleration by up to 40 percent and head impacts by up to 30 percent. Unlike the 6D helmet, the DBX 3.0 only has one shell, keeping the overall size of the helmet smaller. Leatt uses a PC outer shell in three different sizes with 3D in-mold foam. The visor was designed to break away in the event of a crash and has a broad range of adjustment depending on rider preference.

The DBX 3.0 is CPSC 1203 and NE1078 tested, meeting the highest standards of crash safety. The closure system is a magnet Fidlock for easy use and a secure fit. Each helmet has a dial to help riders get the right tension around their heads. The retail price is set at $170 for the DBX 3.0 with a weight of 384 grams.

On the Trail: Pulling the DBX 3.0 out of the box, we were impressed at how sleek the final design was, especially with the added impact protection. The weight of the size-large helmet is competitive with other brands using a MIPS liner or no added protection. Dialing in the fit was straightforward—the shell has a generous shape, and our main test rider was surprised at how well the DBX fit.

The 360 Turbine sits recessed in the shell and didn’t press into our heads causing any discomfort. The visor is bigger than other helmets we have worn, but the broad range of adjustability allowed us to push it up out of our line of sight. Once on the trail, the vent pattern of the DBX amazed our test riders, channeling air in and keeping our heads cool, even at low speeds. On high-speed sections of trail, the vents had us feeling like we weren’t even wearing a helmet at times. We weren’t able to test the impact claims of the 360 Turbine, but we feel confident that it would do its job well in the event of a high-speed impact. Between the price, comfortable fit and subtle shell size, we were impressed with the DBX 3.0 and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to any type of trail rider.

 


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